Further Additions For LPSF Book List Consideration

Dear Everyone;

More books for consideration for the LPSF book list on Amazon. This sampling was put together by Lady Victoria on another Libertarian oriented group site as she is in the know from persoanl experiences and prepared the list at the request of a web site member who wanted to know.

These are about sex workers and their lives. If someone chooses to be a sex worker why should the state stand in their way because the state considers it against morality and criminalizes as vice and causes in California alone some $50 million of wasted time by the police and courts arresting and sentencing sex workers. Starchild as a known example of the stupidity on the part of the state and wasted resources because it criminalized sex as a crime.

More on that later and personal possession marijuna smoking.

The general idea behind the book list is to make it eclectic as as possible and wide ranging as possible so people will buy their books through the website and the LPSF receives some donations.

Keep those book ideas coming on in and we'll ghet to posting soonest. Eventually when we have enough we'll re-organize by general categories and forge ahead from there.

Ron Getty
SF Libertarian

Sex Work: Writings by Women in the Sex Industry

http://tinyurl.com/2dgatc

edited by Frederique Delacoste and Priscilla Alexander, Cleis Press pb, 1987.

"Street prostitutes, exotic dancers, nude models, escorts, porn actresses and workers in massage parlors speak out on sex work, their work. The chorus of these voices rises above the controversies surrounding prostitution, pornography, AIDS and sex in America. "The authors of this book are the experts--they testify to the realities of sex work. The words are out. Who will listen?"

City of Night

Novel by John Rechy, Grove Press, 1963.

http://tinyurl.com/2ygjrh

"When John Rechy's explosive first novel, City of Night, was first published in 1963,it became a national bestseller and ushered in a new era of gay fiction. Bold and inventive in his account of the urban underworld of male prostitution, Rechy is equally unflinching in his portrayal of one hustling "youngman" and his restless search for self-knowledge. As the narrator careens from El Paso to Times Square, from Pershing Square to the French Quarter, we get an unforgettable look at a neon-lit life on the edge. Said James Baldwin of the author, 'Rechy is the most arresting young writer I've read in a very long time. His tone rings absolutely true, is absolutely his own; and he has the kind of discipline which allows him a rare and beautiful recklessness.'"

The Courtesans: The Demi-Monde in 19th Century France

http://tinyurl.com/2x2653

history by Joanna Richardson, Phoenix Press pb, 2000. (UK pub 1967) "In Second Empire Paris there were a dozen courtesans who were generally known as la garde: they were the queens of their profession, the women whom visiting princes thought it essential to see."

Memoirs of a Geisha

http://tinyurl.com/35a4n5

National bestseller novel by Arthur Golden, Vintage pb, 1997.

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Dear Derek;

I can certainly appreciate your point of view. However you said:

One need not celebrate something in order to defend decriminalizing
it.

Maybe you may want to ask Starchild about his thoughts on the matter
from his personal perspective and his criminalization by the state
and the Fremont PD for freely choosing to be a sex worker.

On including Memoirs of a Geisha - the simple fact is she was a sex
worker and having the right to choose a trade is a Libertarian
principle.

Secondly, if it is a popular book and if someone is going to buy it
why not buy it through the web site and get LPSF a donation?

Thirdly, if a book is controversial enough the LPSF has the right of
discussion at the LPSF monthly meeting to keep or withdraw a posted
book.

It would be like banning books on Gold Bugs or books on fractional
reserve banking because they don't say Libertarian every other word.

Not going to happen - right - or would it happen?

Ron Getty
SF Libertarian

--- In lpsf-discuss@yahoogroups.com, "Derek Jensen" <derekj72@...>
wrote:

Ron et al:

In my view, including such books on a list serves far more to

celebrate that

lifestyle than it does to condemn state's tyrranical actions toward

same.

How could "Memoirs of a Geisha" possibly be a libertarian tract?

One need not celebrate something in order to defend decriminalizing

it.

>
> Dear Everyone;
>
> More books for consideration for the LPSF book list on Amazon.

This

> sampling was put together by Lady Victoria on another Libertarian

oriented

> group site as she is in the know from persoanl experiences and

prepared the

> list at the request of a web site member who wanted to know.
>
> These are about sex workers and their lives. If someone chooses

to be

> a sex worker why should the state stand in their way because the

state

> considers it against morality and criminalizes as vice and causes

in

> California alone some $50 million of wasted time by the police

and courts

> arresting and sentencing sex workers. Starchild as a known

example of the

> stupidity on the part of the state and wasted resources because it
> criminalized sex as a crime.
>
> More on that later and personal possession marijuna smoking.
>
> The general idea behind the book list is to make it eclectic as as
> possible and wide ranging as possible so people will buy their

books through

> the website and the LPSF receives some donations.
>
> Keep those book ideas coming on in and we'll ghet to posting

soonest.

> Eventually when we have enough we'll re-organize by general

categories and

> forge ahead from there.
>
> Ron Getty
> SF Libertarian
>
> **
> *Sex Work: Writings by Women in the Sex Industry*
>
> *http://tinyurl.com/2dgatc*
> **
> edited by Frederique Delacoste and Priscilla Alexander, Cleis

Press pb,

> 1987.
>
> "Street prostitutes, exotic dancers, nude models, escorts, porn

actresses

> and workers in massage parlors speak out on sex work, their

work. The

> chorus of these voices rises above the controversies surrounding
> prostitution, pornography, AIDS and sex in America. "The authors

of this

> book are the experts--they testify to the realities of sex work.

The words

> are out. Who will listen?"
>
> *City of Night*
>
> Novel by John Rechy, Grove Press, 1963.
>
> *http://tinyurl.com/2ygjrh*
> **
> "When John Rechy's explosive first novel, City of Night, was first
> published in 1963,it became a national bestseller and ushered in

a new

> era of gay fiction. Bold and inventive in his account of the

urban

> underworld of male prostitution, Rechy is equally unflinching

in his

> portrayal of one hustling "youngman" and his restless search for
> self-knowledge. As the narrator careens from El Paso to Times

Square,

> from Pershing Square to the French Quarter, we get an

unforgettable look at

> a neon-lit life on the edge. Said James Baldwin of the

author, 'Rechy is

> the most arresting young writer I've read in a very long time.

His tone rings

> absolutely true, is absolutely his own; and he has the kind of

discipline

> which allows him a rare and beautiful recklessness.'"
>
> *The Courtesans: The Demi-Monde in 19th Century France*
> **
> *http://tinyurl.com/2x2653*
> **
> history by Joanna Richardson, Phoenix Press pb, 2000. (UK pub

1967) "In

> Second Empire Paris there were a dozen courtesans who were

generally known

> as *la garde: *they were the queens of their profession, the

women whom

Thanks, Ron. I appreciate you recommending these fine books, and your empathy for my situation. And your equating a book on sex work with one on fractional reserve banking in this context points, I think, to a valid and important observation: The freedom to earn money in the worlds of business and finance is not the same thing as celebrating those who do so, yet it is my experience that libertarians conflate these things far more often than they do the decriminalization of prostitution and the celebration of same.

  On the other hand, I can also see Derek's point very clearly, and would have to agree with him that books about sex work per se are not really libertarian.

  But as was discussed at our meeting, our aim is to arrange it so that *any* purchase made on Amazon.com through the LPSF site will earn us a commission. So linked items need not be libertarian in order to bring us revenue. Of course if someone has a real problem with a particular book suggested for linking to Amazon on our site, they are free to put a hold on the listing until we can discuss and vote on the matter at a meeting, as per the policy I suggested and we approved on Saturday, but I would hope that this step would be taken rarely.

  While we ought not to lose sight of the distinction between calling for the decriminalization of something and advocating it, I believe we should also recognize that the public is more likely to support something being legal if they see it in at least a somewhat positive light, and that our primary goal as libertarians is of two parts: making the involuntary illegal, and making the voluntary legal. Considerable government resources are typically expended in the demonization of that which is banned, an effort which must be countered just for the field of public opinion to be level. Therefore when it comes to something which now is or may soon be criminalized -- whether it be prostitution, pistols, or plastic bags -- it may behoove us to give it a bit more sympathetic treatment and stray a bit closer to celebration than we would in a libertarian society where it could be taken for granted that one could vociferously condemn something not involving the initiation of force without any possibility of it being banned.

  "Memoirs of a Geisha," incidentally, is less a "celebration" of sex work -- geishas were not exactly prostitutes in any case, although it's a related occupation -- than a chronicle of the hardships endured by such Japanese during the early twentieth century and World War II.

Love & Liberty,
        <<< starchild >>>

While we're sort of on the subject, I don't think I posted on here yet that I have -- after much delay -- been assigned a date for the start of my trial: September 24, 2007. There are two hearings shortly prior to that, on September 12th and 19th. The first is a further hearing on our discovery motion, and the second is a follow-up readiness hearing. All three of these dates could be important, so I would greatly welcome the attendance of anyone who can come out for court support on any of these dates, if you would like to put them in your calendars, especially the trial itself of course. I'm told the trial might last two or three days.

  The time and place of each appearance are the usual, 9:00 a.m. at the Fremont municipal courthouse, 39439 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA, 94538. There is plenty of free parking at the courthouse, and it is also a short distance from the Fremont BART station (maybe a 10 minute walk). From BART, go out of the parking lot onto Walnut Avenue, and make a right. Pass Civic Center Drive, and the next big intersection is Paseo Padre Parkway. Make a left, and it's across the street about half a block down.

Love & Liberty,
        <<< starchild >>>