a courtesan's book of illusions; 'deck of cards'

My good greetings-

     Some time past some advice in life for the young wound through
this forum. This courtesan and student of history, who remembers
months far better than minutes, is merry to report that she may now
give riposte in her own tongue. She happily leaves little revenges
of theological needling for another time, but this quite satisfies
her elsewise. Enjoy!

"Let man be delivered from revenge... that for me is the bridge to
the highest hope."
   - Nietzsche

   ...yeah, yeah, yeah. Two words, Fred: "Lou Salome".
                                          (also: "Cosima Wagner")
   We believe you.

impish regards,

Jeanine Ring

call it: 'the practical world as I see it'

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

'Deck of Cards'

Is their Emporer so obvious,
and transparent, all their lies,
that our virtue's only violence;
and despair in pale disguise?
Are you a young grey-eyed philosopher.
an Atalanta of the pen?
In search of art's emporium
among streets of artless men?

I assume you cry for better
than their layout for your life.
If you ask for independence
you will not make Mother, Wife,
slave of men, and maid of children,
born to breed and polish chains.
Else than Kinder, Kueche, and Kirche,
any price commits no pains.

I do hope you're not so stulted
to seek safety in the state
call it welfare, call it service,
call it bribes, or call it bait.
You will slowly be digested in the
belly of the beast,
if you have to sell your soul
please demand *something*, at the least.

Think your safety's in success?
You'll get a job, you'll got it made?
But each moment for next moment's
but a madness on parade.
You will strive as one possessed
to pile your possessions high.
Then at last, atop your mountain,
you will die.

While they say the crafts and industry
care a fig leaf for success;
if we mean by that, 'production',
Mr. Babbitt could care less.
He will count your craft as competent
when you put that "I" in "Team".
For the ducat of the dominant,
one demand: 'displace your dream'.

To start up in your own commerce,
set up shop, and own your own?
Well, to this, I say 'good fortune',
(if you're rich before you're grown.)
You had best preserve a family
to begin your own support.
But I don't think that's so likely where
their morals are the court.

Fly to groves of academia?
Once a monolith was made,
but I sadly think those olive groves
no longer offer shade.
You will toil in their vineyards,
your vocation turned career.
what your spirit seeks in freedom...
*"Seldom Taught or Tenured Here."*

There are alter institutions,
they keep house to left and right.
But aristocrats or democrats,
in the end the choice is slight.
For no matter their persuasion
there will keep you, party line,
any words they pay to hear
will posess as they define.

Ain't it Mister Libertarian, in his purest Liberty,
Friend, I know your statue well,
and she says, "freedom isn't free".
So you caught your corporation;
you commanded quite a price!
But we won't see you at market,
any time soon, choosing twice.

Would you spur your soul to protest?
Join the heroes?
Storm the gate?
You can climb atop the barricade,
but it won't support your weight.
When they hear you've chosen freedom,
they will never let you live;
for they own the world,
our oligarchs,
and your life is
theirs to give.

Well, we've slain our aristocracy,
and the convents, closed their doors,
and I do not doubt the justice, nor the reasons,
for those wars.
But there's little love of learning
with our oligarchs obtuse,
and in nine-to-five men liesure
harbors less and little use.

So, are you a soul of intellect?
Does your artistry cry: *time!*?
Then I fear your lines may follow
like the meter of this rhyme.
For they'll only forgive freedom,
allow art, if they've no choice,
but if you would sing their sonnets
they will have to leave you voice.

Look from Crete to San Francisco,
there has always been one place;
a last refuge for intelligence
in half this human race.
We are still so neolithic
in this nanotechnic age.
Yet the love of wisdom lives,
if it can love upon the stage.

You can doubt I own my boldness
in my flourish of attire.
But it's most who call that passion,
die, and never taste its fire.
Oh, they hollar and they hesitate,
where I am not afraid.
And yet some presume I doubt
these more than choices I have made.

To condemn my calucations,
yet exalt in enterprise.
To wear any colors asked for,
and yet call this life disguise.
I am social all in passing;
as I stand, I stand alone.
so *stand forth!*, you damned hypocrites,
with your lives you call your own.

Now, it's been a span of months
though it has seemed a swirl of years.
No, my overeducation does not quite requite all tears.
Yet, where I was blindly walking,
I am now forestanding proud,
I'll wikk this skein of starlight,
to my goddess, as my shroud.

Quite a frigid muse is history,
but I read, the truth is hard:
we have shuffled up the deck
but we have not yet changed a card.
I have cried for liberation,
I have tried to change this plan.
But we're round
               and round
                        and round
and we are back where we began.

Huuummmm....OK, Jeanine, I need help here. I read the poem all the
way through (actually enjoyed doing so!), and saw it as a call to
discard wordly focus (something like, serving Mammon will for sure
bring you chagrin). So, I will go along with that. But the question
I have posed several times before to this Libertarian group is: Do
you achieve "liberty" by eschewing worldliness and living a liberated
life yourself; or do you wade into the muck of worldliness to effect
change in that world? I say wade right in, by making money so you can
donate to the causes you believe in, by running for office, by
encouraging others to vote for people and proposed laws that will
likely not curb liberties further, by making deals with those in
power (horrors!). I have quoted Antigone's Creon before, but here it
is again: "It is easy to say NO. To say yes, you have to sweat, and
roll up your sleeves and plunge both hands into life up to the
elbows. [to say NO means] All you have to do is to sit still and
wait. Wait to go on living; wait to be killed."

Regards,

Marcy

--- In lpsf-discuss@yahoogroups.com, "Jeanie Ring" <jeanie_ring@h...>
wrote:

Huuummmm....OK, Jeanine, I need help here. I read the poem all the
way through (actually enjoyed doing so!), and saw it as a call to
discard wordly focus (something like, serving Mammon will for sure
bring you chagrin). So, I will go along with that. But the

question

I have posed several times before to this Libertarian group is: Do
you achieve "liberty" by eschewing worldliness and living a

liberated

life yourself; or do you wade into the muck of worldliness to effect
change in that world? I say wade right in, by making money so you

can

donate to the causes you believe in, by running for office, by
encouraging others to vote for people and proposed laws that will
likely not curb liberties further, by making deals with those in
power (horrors!). I have quoted Antigone's Creon before, but here it
is again: "It is easy to say NO. To say yes, you have to sweat,

and

roll up your sleeves and plunge both hands into life up to the
elbows. [to say NO means] All you have to do is to sit still and
wait. Wait to go on living; wait to be killed."

Regards,

Marcy

Marcy-

'tis a matter of taste, then-

I prefer Antigone to Creon, _Medea_ and _Lysistrata_ to Sophocles.

I seek to live according to convictions and desires; I do not seek to
live to establish a politics.

If your passion is politics and you can achieve such heights, do so
with my blessing; politics is an excellence with a different code than
either courtesanship or liberal philsophy, and I respect that.

But I do not ask anyone to give up passion for oughts they ought to
achieve. I recognize none; any ethics I recognize flows, as does
Objectivism's, from the facts of nature and the requirements of
flourishing in a social world. Libertarianism in letter *and* in
spirit- I name any prudent predators as foolish from the beginning of
the axiom- *is* in my knowledge a consequence of this.

But whether desires blossom into colors we must learn to bring to
light or whether desires look to proper places to which they must be
bent if neccesary is a final issue; one which may be set aside for
common and needful purpose, but not forgotten. I will have no desire
bent, even for liberty- though to me that notion winces me with
contradictions. I will not give my happiness, my passion, my art, or
my vocation for libertarianism, though under certain extreme
circumstances I might give my life for it.

And it is not Mammon I oppose; to him I have no hard feelings. I am
not unworldly. What I am is unrespecting of the orders of society and
unwilling to pay their prices; I am very worldly in my desires; the
worldliness of intelligence first and foremost, and the worldliness of
Eros in the second.

Promiscuity of the mind leads to promiscuity of the body.

What I oppose is Law outside the human breast and everything in its
image.

my regards,

Jeanine Ring {))(*)((}

"...'tis a matter of taste," how we seek liberty. I like your answer,
Jeanine. Thank you.

Marcy

--- In lpsf-discuss@yahoogroups.com, "Jeanie Ring" <jeanie_ring@h...>
wrote:

> Huuummmm....OK, Jeanine, I need help here. I read the poem all

the

> way through (actually enjoyed doing so!), and saw it as a call to
> discard wordly focus (something like, serving Mammon will for

sure

> bring you chagrin). So, I will go along with that. But the
question
> I have posed several times before to this Libertarian group is:

Do

> you achieve "liberty" by eschewing worldliness and living a
liberated
> life yourself; or do you wade into the muck of worldliness to

effect

> change in that world? I say wade right in, by making money so you
can
> donate to the causes you believe in, by running for office, by
> encouraging others to vote for people and proposed laws that will
> likely not curb liberties further, by making deals with those in
> power (horrors!). I have quoted Antigone's Creon before, but here

it

> is again: "It is easy to say NO. To say yes, you have to sweat,
and
> roll up your sleeves and plunge both hands into life up to the
> elbows. [to say NO means] All you have to do is to sit still and
> wait. Wait to go on living; wait to be killed."
>
> Regards,
>
> Marcy

Marcy-

'tis a matter of taste, then-

I prefer Antigone to Creon, _Medea_ and _Lysistrata_ to Sophocles.

I seek to live according to convictions and desires; I do not seek

to

live to establish a politics.

If your passion is politics and you can achieve such heights, do so
with my blessing; politics is an excellence with a different code

than

either courtesanship or liberal philsophy, and I respect that.

But I do not ask anyone to give up passion for oughts they ought to
achieve. I recognize none; any ethics I recognize flows, as does
Objectivism's, from the facts of nature and the requirements of
flourishing in a social world. Libertarianism in letter *and* in
spirit- I name any prudent predators as foolish from the beginning

of

the axiom- *is* in my knowledge a consequence of this.

But whether desires blossom into colors we must learn to bring to
light or whether desires look to proper places to which they must

be

bent if neccesary is a final issue; one which may be set aside for
common and needful purpose, but not forgotten. I will have no

desire

bent, even for liberty- though to me that notion winces me with
contradictions. I will not give my happiness, my passion, my art,

or

my vocation for libertarianism, though under certain extreme
circumstances I might give my life for it.

And it is not Mammon I oppose; to him I have no hard feelings. I

am

not unworldly. What I am is unrespecting of the orders of society

and

unwilling to pay their prices; I am very worldly in my desires; the
worldliness of intelligence first and foremost, and the worldliness

of