SF Examiner Publishes My Anti-Federal Spending LTE

Magnificent, Ron!

Is this published in the on-line or hard copy edition?

Best, Michael

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Dear Derek;

Dats easy - earn less and you will have only 1/3 taken in all taxes
combined.

The example I gave which I sent to the Examiner used the average
$50,000 of income a private industry worker earns and yes they will
have total fed state social security medicare etc taxes taken of
about $17,000. Unfortunately the Examiner cut out that part when they
published.

But don't you own a home with mortgage payments and therefore
mortgage interest deductions and property tax deductions and have a
passle of kids so you must be enjoying some tax breaks which a lot of
other people just plain don't got for themselves.

Ron Getty
SF Libertarian

--- In lpsf-discuss@yahoogroups.com, "Derek Edward Jensen Sr."
<derekj72@...> wrote:

Ron:

Please let me know how I can arrange to have only 1/3 of my income

taken in

taxes.

>
> Magnificent, Ron!
>
> Is this published in the on-line or hard copy edition?
>
> Best, Michael
>
> *To:* Libertarian Yahoo Group <lpsf-discuss@yahoogroups.com> ;

CAL-LIBS<cal-libs@...m>

> *Sent:* Friday, November 17, 2006 7:05 AM
> *Subject:* [lpsf-discuss] SF Examiner Publishes My Anti-Federal

Spending

> LTE
>
>
> Dear Everyone;
>
> The SF Examiner had an editorial on Thursday welcominmg the

changes in

> Congress. Then they started to wax enthusiaistic about the new

federal

> spending which should take place for the SF Bay Area and

California because

> Pelosi would be in charge. I immediately took keyboard in hand

and typed out

> a riposte to this. The SF Examiner agreed and published without

affiliation

> this time and some editing.
>
> Ron Getty
> SF Libertarian
>
> *http://tinyurl.com/vzgv8* Letters: November 17, 2006 Taxes are

thievery

>
> Your editorial ["House speaker largesse coming," Nov. 16] bespeaks
> sugar-plums-dancing-in-their-heads thinking. Drooling over the

potential

> cornucopia of dollar bills pouring down on the Bay Area and

California is

> contemptuous of where the money comes from.
>
> The money comes from dollars forcibly taken from wage earners.

Imagine

> what it would be like if those dollars were never taken in the

first place.

> Between federal and state income and payroll taxes, a person has

a third of

> their income taken before they get their paycheck.
>
> Stop the thievery and let us decide how we spend the money we

earn.

>
> Ron Getty
>
> The City
>
>
>
> To show how editors edit for space this is the original LTE as

submitted

> which was below the 150 word minimum:
>
>
>
> Dear Letters;
>
>
>
> Your editorial ["House speaker largesse coming", 11-16] bespeaks

of "sugar

> plums dancing in their heads" thinking. Your drooling over the

potential

> cornucopia of dollar bills pouring down on the Bay Area and

California is

> contemptuous of where the money comes from.
>
>
>
> The money comes from dollars forcibly taken from wage earners.

Imagine

> what it would be like if those dollars were never taken in the

first place.

> Between federal and state income and payroll taxes a person has a

third of

> their income taken before they get their paycheck. A private

business

> employee earning the San Francisco average income of $50,000 has

$17,000

> taken in taxes.
>
>
>
> Government forcing involuntary philanthropy on taxpayers'

earnings then

> returning a portion in spending is Robbing Hood riding rough shod

over our

> wallets. Stop the thievery and let us decide how we spend the

money we earn.

>
>
>
> Ron Getty
>
> Chair, Initiatives Committee
>
> Libertarian Party of San Francisco
>
>
>
> The origianl SF Examiner editorial.
>
> *http://tinyurl.com/y9go9d*
> **
>
> Editorial Editorial: House speaker largesse coming
> The San Francisco Examiner Newspaper, The Examiner
> Read more by The San Francisco Examiner

Newspaper<http://www.examiner.com/Topic-
By_The_San_Francisco_Examiner_Newspaper.html>

> Nov 16, 2006 2:00 AM
>
> SAN FRANCISCO -
>
> When it comes to an upsurge in federal funding generosity for

local

> priorities, better times ahead are likely in store for the Bay

Area and

> California in general. Historically, Speakers of the U.S. House of
> Representatives have funneled impressive amounts of cash to their

home

> states. And speakers don't particularly need to scramble for

appropriations

> because fellow congressmen are only too willing to keep them

happy.

> House Speaker Tip O'Neill virtually created the $14.6 billion

financial

> package for downtown Boston's Big Dig tunnel, to date the single

most

> expensive public works project in U.S. history. Dennis Hastert,

who is

> resigning as of year-end after being speaker since 1999,

channeled millions

> of dollars to his hometown of Aurora, Ill.
>
> Seventeen-year speaker Sam Rayburn showered his native Texas with

federal

> construction and boosted the oil industry with valuable tax

breaks. Yet

> Rayburn's honesty was legendary. He accepted no contributions

from lobbyists

> and insisted on paying his own expenses everywhere. He died in

1961 with

> only $10,000 in personal savings.
>
> It is to be fervently hoped that San Franciscan Nancy Pelosi, who

will

> become the first Californian as well as the first woman to be

elected

> speaker of the House, will follow in the Rayburn tradition of

integrity.

> There is a fine line between being responsive to the legitimate

needs of

> longtime local supporters and merely throwing big money at your

home

> district for unnecessary projects such as that notorious Alaskan

bridge to

> nowhere.
>
> On the other hand, it would almost seem like payback for

California to

> finally have the chance to win a fairer return on its federal

taxes. Studies

> consistently show that for many decades, California taxpayers

have been

> paying considerably more to Washington than they get back in

terms of

> federal spending. For example, military bases and U.S. research

facilities

> consistently went to less-populated states that were home to

longtime

> congressional committee chairman.
>
> Now with the Democrats returned to the majority in both houses of
> Congress, the large and predominantly Democratic California

delegation will

> wield great power and hold key spending-committee chairmanships.

The Bay

> Area will be home to a possibly unprecedented concentration of

senior

> congressional leaders.
>
> Speaker-to-be Nancy Pelosi is of course from San Francisco, as is
> three-term Sen. Diane Feinstein. California's second senator,

Barbara Boxer,

> lives just across the Golden Gate Bridge in Marin County.

Congressman Tom

> Lantos of San Mateo County has served 24 years and is in line to

chair the

> House Foreign Relations Committee.
>
> None of these members of Congress has ever been the least bit shy

about

> actively going after significant funding for the Bay Area. With

California's

> passage of a record-breaking infrastructure bond package this

month,

> matching federal funds are likely to flow through from Washington

more

> smoothly than in the past.
>
> If there is an immediate downside to the Bay Area's suddenly

improved

> congressional clout, it is the risk that San Francisco could look

bad and

> lose business opportunities if a blatantly pork "bridge to

nowhere" type of

> project arrives locally. Also, Pelosi's political enemies will be

watching

> more closely than ever for opportunities to castigate "San

Francisco values"