[Sdlibchat] World's 85 richest have same wealth as 3.5 billion poorest - NBC News.com

Paul,

  Thanks for posting this reminder of the "big picture". It is one that I think libertarians ignore at our peril (i.e. to the extent we ignore it, we imperil the cause of freedom).

  The left has some tired, well-worn narratives about this problem of inequality, and how to fix it. Perceptive people understand they generally don't work, but as we know, many people are not very perceptive about this stuff. Libertarian narratives are less well-known, and more nuanced, because we don't see inequality as problematic to the extent that the left does -- we understand that the "solution" of trying to achieve equality by force is worse than the problem it attempts to solve.

  But we need to talk about our narratives, so that people don't absorb inaccurate narratives that lead them to embrace misguided leftist "solutions" that rely on aggression. We need to explain how the statist quo of Big Government greatly *exacerbates* inequality.

  The good news is that -- as the article below references -- "A survey in six countries (Spain, Brazil, India, South Africa, the UK and the U.S.) showed that a majority of people believe that laws are skewed in favor of the rich."

  In other words, most people already perceive a fact that is key to the libertarian narrative -- that this situation of an extreme wealth gap in the world is not a "natural" result of *capitalism* or somehow due to a shortage of basic compassion or decency, but rather the result of the wealthy using the power of government to skew the rules to benefit themselves. It is not a coincidence that as governments have grown in size, scope, power, and cost, the gap between rich and poor has grown apace.

  The task facing those of us in the freedom movement is to explain in detail how this occurs, and what steps should be taken to address it. Anyone in politics who simply pretends this is not a problem, risks losing credibility both with the poor, and with those who are idealistic and care about injustice (i.e. the kinds of people who become activists and are the backbone of political movements).

Love & Liberty,
                                   ((( starchild )))
At-Large Representative, Libertarian National Committee

(Attachment image001.jpeg is missing)

A speech was given yesterday to the convention of the Manhattan Libertarian
Party by Dorit Goikhman, the new Vice-Chairman of the New Jersey
Libertarian Party and she explained her answer when questions like this are
raised.

She replies that both of her parents were born in the Soviet Union where
income equality was supposed to exist.

Therefore, she knows the consequences of that type of thinking.

However, Americans who have never experienced this cannot understand where
that type of thinking leads.

Sam Sloan

(Attachment image001.jpeg is missing)

Oops - I hit "Send" too soon and managed to leave a couple key points out of my remarks below. Here's a revised and hopefully improved version...

Paul,

  Thanks for posting this reminder of the "big picture". It is one that I think libertarians ignore at our peril (i.e. to the extent we ignore it, we imperil the cause of freedom).

  The left has some tired, well-worn narratives about this problem of inequality, and how to fix it. Perceptive people understand they generally don't work, but as we know, many people are not very perceptive about this stuff. Libertarian narratives are less well-known, and more nuanced, because unlike leftists we don't see inequality as inherently problematic -- we understand that the moderate levels of economic inequality which would occur naturally in a free society are inevitable and even to some extent desirable as a way to incentivize and reward achievement that helps others. We also understand that the "solution" of trying to achieve equality of outcomes by force is worse than the problem it attempts to solve.

  But we need to talk about our narratives, so that people don't absorb inaccurate narratives that lead them to embrace misguided leftist "solutions" that rely on aggression. We need to explain how the statist quo of Big Government greatly *exacerbates* inequality, and that the root of the problem is not too much human greed or too little human compassion, but simply too much government. And we need to make it clear that this exacerbated inequality, of the sort documented in the story below, is *not* a natural result of free markets, and that we do *not* consider it acceptable.

  The good news is that -- as the article references -- "A survey in six countries (Spain, Brazil, India, South Africa, the UK and the U.S.) showed that a majority of people believe that laws are skewed in favor of the rich."

  In other words, most people already perceive a fact that is key to the libertarian narrative -- that this situation of an extreme wealth gap in the world is connected with the wealthy using the power of government to skew the rules to benefit themselves. It is not a coincidence that as governments have grown in size, scope, power, and cost, the gap between rich and poor has grown apace.

  The task facing those of us in the freedom movement is to explain in detail how this occurs, and what steps should be taken to address it. Anyone in politics who simply pretends this is not a problem, risks losing credibility both with the poor, and with those who are idealistic and care about injustice (i.e. the kinds of people who become activists and are the backbone of political movements).

Love & Liberty,
                            ((( starchild )))
At-Large Representative, Libertarian National Committee

“Think occasionally of the suffering of which you spare yourself the sight.”

– Albert Schweitzer

(Attachment image001.jpeg is missing)

This is an excellent statement:

"In other words, most people already perceive a fact that is key to the libertarian narrative -- that this situation of an extreme wealth gap in the world is not a "natural" result of *capitalism* or somehow due to a shortage of basic compassion or decency, but rather the result of the wealthy using the power of government to skew the rules to benefit themselves. It is not a coincidence that as governments have grown in size, scope, power, and cost, the gap between rich and poor has grown apace."

Speaking points can proceed form this, to nearly every issue.

BTW,
I learned today that Bruce Fein is the lawyer for Snowden's father. He and I spoke at a Liberty Labs event and I have his phone number.

I'll call tomorrow to see what he thinks about a possible Snowden-challenge to Pelosi's seat in Congress.

John

________________________________
From: Starchild <sfdreamer@...>
To: San Diego Libertarian Chat <sdlibchat@...>
Cc: Grassroots Libertarians Caucus <GrassrootsLibertarians@yahoogroups.com>; Sue Simpson <simpsonjs@...>; jimnobleman@...; jackwackerman@...; Billy and Sharon <drwbell@...>; LNC Discussion List <lnc-discuss@....org>; LPSF Discussion List <lpsf-discuss@yahoogroups.com>; calibs <CALibs@yahoogroups.com>; California Liberty <ca-liberty@yahoogroups.com>; LP Radical Caucus <lpradicals@yahoogroups.com>; lpusmisc@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2014 9:07 AM
Subject: [lpsf-discuss] P.S. - Re: [GrassrootsLibertarians] Re: [Sdlibchat] World's 85 richest have same wealth as 3.5 billion poorest - NBC News.com [1 Attachment]

Oops - I hit "Send" too soon and managed to leave a couple key points out of my remarks below. Here's a revised and hopefully improved version...

Paul,

Thanks for posting this reminder of the "big picture". It is one that I think libertarians ignore at our peril (i.e. to the extent we ignore it, we imperil the cause of freedom).

The left has some tired, well-worn narratives about this problem of inequality, and how to fix it. Perceptive people understand they generally don't work, but as we know, many people are not very perceptive about this stuff. Libertarian narratives are less well-known, and more nuanced, because unlike leftists we don't see inequality as inherently problematic -- we understand that the moderate levels of economic inequality which would occur naturally in a free society are inevitable and even to some extent desirable as a way to incentivize and reward achievement that helps others. We also understand that the "solution" of trying to achieve equality of outcomes by force is worse than the problem it attempts to solve.

But we need to talk about our narratives, so that people don't absorb inaccurate narratives that lead them to embrace misguided leftist "solutions" that rely on aggression. We need to explain how the statist quo of Big Government greatly *exacerbates* inequality, and that the root of the problem is not too much human greed or too little human compassion, but simply too much government. And we need to make it clear that this exacerbated inequality, of the sort documented in the story below, is *not* a natural result of free markets, and that we do *not* consider it acceptable.

The good news is that -- as the article references -- "A survey in six countries (Spain, Brazil, India, South Africa, the UK and the U.S.) showed that a majority of people believe that laws are skewed in favor of the rich."

In other words, most people already perceive a fact that is key to the libertarian narrative -- that this situation of an extreme wealth gap in the world is connected with the wealthy using the power of government to skew the rules to benefit themselves. It is not a coincidence that as governments have grown in size, scope, power, and cost, the gap between rich and poor has grown apace.

The task facing those of us in the freedom movement is to explain in detail how this occurs, and what steps should be taken to address it. Anyone in politics who simply pretends this is not a problem, risks losing credibility both with the poor, and with those who are idealistic and care about injustice (i.e. the kinds of people who become activists and are the backbone of political movements).

Love & Liberty,
((( starchild )))
At-Large Representative, Libertarian National Committee

“Think occasionally of the suffering of which

you spare yourself the sight.”

– Albert

Schweitzer

(Attachment image001.jpeg is missing)