Prop. 54/racial issues

Dave,

  One way to address the issues raised by Prop. 54 is to focus on people
who are multiracial. Why should such individuals be forced by
government into denying part of their heritage by being stuck in a
single box?

  The fact that it is folks of mixed heritage whose existence is being
marginalized is no coincidence. The racial demagogues in society don't
want people to intermingle. They don't want people to have mixed
allegiances — they want everyone to be one color, and one color only.
Note, in this context, the term "La Raza" used by a number of leftist
hispanics — it means "the race" — as if all other ethnicities are
irrelevant. Of course the advocates of maintaining racial divisions
can't achieve this in reality, but they will go to great lengths to
have government maintain the fiction. It helps perpetuate racism when
people are either/or rather than neither/both.

  I'm also glad to see you put the term "people of color" in quotes.
This is a subtly racist term that I often actively discourage people
from using. It attempts to divide the world into two groups of people,
those of loosely European ancestry and everyone else, implying that the
former group is colorless, or lacks color, and trying to symbolically
unite everyone else against them.

  Ward Connerly is extremely good at clarifying and articulating these
issues. People wanting more arguments against Prop. 54 might do well to
look up him or his group (I believe it's called the American Civil
Rights Coalition.)

Yours in liberty,
              <<< Starchild >>>

Hi Everyone,

I want to know if anyone is going to the Political
Chat tonight. If so, a topic I would like to suggest
for discussion would be Prop. 54.

Voting yes on Prop. 54, from my understanding, would
eliminate government institutions from collecting
racial and ethnic data on people, which is currently
done by those boxes at the end of most forms we are
asked to fill out. People in favor of such collection
of information are urging people to vote No on prop.
54, allowing this to continue.

People who want this collection of data by government
institutions to end, and be illegal, want people to
vote Yes on prop. 54, which will make it illegal.

This sounds pretty straight-forward to me, and an easy
decision to vote on, however, we do live in the
Alice-in-Wonderland times that we live in now.

Who would think we would come to a time when many
people would be in favor of supporting a government
database collecting names of people and classifying
them by their race or ethnicity? If one just looks at
the track record of government's oppression of people
throughout history, why would one be in favor of so
easily allowing those who are, or who could be in a
position of power, to have access to such a thing?

Being a public school teacher, and a student at a
university, so many people I meet are in favor of
keeping the collection of racial data in place. Many,
many students are walking around with buttons that say
to vote non on 54, keeping racial data collecton in
place. Those who I've heard speaking claim it's for
tracking health-related issues, and making sure
"People of Color" and "minorities" are having their
needs met. How can we, as Libertarians, convince
people that this is not a good idea without coming
across as being uncompassionate to the health and
"equity" of 'People of Color?'

People claim that this is an attack on "People of
Color" (voting yes on 54). They want government
institutions to continue to collect racial and ethnic
data on POC, and they claim that those who are against
this (Voting yes on 54), are against "progress" made
in making sure the needs of POC are met.

Met by who? The government? Again, this is truely
amazing to me that I would see so many people,
especially non-white people, wanting to continue such
collection of such personal information on them, by
people and institutions that they don't even know.

How do we convince people that this is wrong, without
sounding that we aren't against "non-white" people
making progress? This is similar with other issues we
have to debate on without sounding uncompassionate,
such as the environment, "universal" health care,
living wage laws, etc. etc....

I hope people will continue the political Chats, even
though I can't make them anymore. Tonight I start my
first class on how to be a Principal of our government
schools. I wish I could share some of the material we
are asked to read (for this class) with all of you.
The last essay I had to read in preparation for my
class tonight was against free-market solutions to
public schooling. None of the arguments in this essay
pointed to why they were against free-market
principles, but just mentioned over and over the word
"social justice" and a "lack of equity," throughout
the entire essay. It's incredible.

Dave Barker.

=====
"No man's life, liberty or property are safe while the legislature is
in session."
Nineteenth century jurist

"A little rebellion is a good thing now and then."
Thomas Jefferson

"One has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws."
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr

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Dear friends:

I am glad (ecstatic in fact,) that this issue is being addressed. I am one of those "multi-racial" persons mentioned in these discussions, so perhaps my point of view would be of value. I was born in the GREAT city of Berkeley of multi-racial parents. The neighbourhood that I grew up on was a truly multi-cultural environment. We had many different representatives of Europe, Africa, Asia, as well as other American-born families that were multi-racial. Additionally, my parents gave me no indoctrination into any ideas of how I was supposed to inter-act, who to associate with, or labels of any kind. In fact, my parents racial make-up was rarely discussed. Henceforth, the identity that I am extremely happy to possess is my own. And one of my prevailing missions in life is to refute and challenge any and all attempts by others to force me to accept any label. When I am asked the irrelevant (and offensively annoying) question of "what are you?" my response after asking a rebuttal question
of "why do you need this information?" is to respond with, I am the same race as you; human. The specifics are rarely divulged as I resent the question on principle, and feel strongly that it is irrelevant. Although, if given a choice, I would prefer to be asked rather than have a race arbitrarily assigned, which is frequently done. This infuriates me to say the least, and WILL be challenged every time.
It was not until several years ago, that I finally realised that my child-hood experience was unique to say the least. However, growing up in 1970's Berkeley was a great thing, and one of the many things I learned was individualism (militantly sometimes,") and not letting people force their ideologies upon you. Even though I do not now reside in Berkeley, I do attend school there, am constantly there, and love the city very much.

I confess, that I was unaware of the specifics of Proposition 54, and I am still confused about the implications of such. I will say, that when asked on a form to declare a race, I check the other block and put Human on the line. If there is no such option, I write-in "none-of-the-above." I found that by ignoring it altogether, someone will arbitrarily decide for you. In conclusion, I feel that all of this energy and time spent wondering what race someone is is ludicrous and an extreme waste of time. Now I vacate my soap-box.
(At least for now, that is.)

Leilani

Dave,

One way to address the issues raised by Prop. 54 is to focus on people
who are multiracial. Why should such individuals be forced by
government into denying part of their heritage by being stuck in a
single box?

The fact that it is folks of mixed heritage whose existence is being
marginalized is no coincidence. The racial demagogues in society don't
want people to intermingle. They don't want people to have mixed
allegiances � they want everyone to be one color, and one color only.
Note, in this context, the term "La Raza" used by a number of leftist
hispanics � it means "the race" � as if all other ethnicities are
irrelevant. Of course the advocates of maintaining racial divisions
can't achieve this in reality, but they will go to great lengths to
have government maintain the fiction. It helps perpetuate racism when
people are either/or rather than neither/both.

I'm also glad to see you put the term "people of color" in quotes.
This is a subtly racist term that I often actively discourage people
from using. It attempts to divide the world into two groups of people,
those of loosely European ancestry and everyone else, implying that the
former group is colorless, or lacks color, and trying to symbolically
unite everyone else against them.

Ward Connerly is extremely good at clarifying and articulating these
issues. People wanting more arguments against Prop. 54 might do well to
look up him or his group (I believe it's called the American Civil
Rights Coalition.)

Yours in liberty,
<<< Starchild >>>