Patent Systems Not an Effective Incentive

Dear Michael and All,

Ah! Talk about banning from list, so I will reinsert myself into this interesting discussion! Michael, I appreciate your passion for this subject!

The reason I posted on this subject was to, once again, encourage objective review of existing laws. Do we have patent laws because the big bad government put them there, or because inventors want them there? If the latter is the case, why do inventors want them there? If the reason is to protect their investment in the development of their invention, then, as Libertarians, maybe our discussion should focus on how we devise methods by which that could be accomplished privately?

Conversely, if we feel that any restriction on public use of inventions stifle innovation, then maybe we should direct our arguments to inventors, in an effort to dissuade them from wanting such restrictions?

Which part of the subject are we discussing?

Marcy

Dear Marcy;

You wrote in part:

Conversely, if we feel that any restriction on public use of inventions stifle innovation, then maybe we should direct our arguments to inventors, in an effort to dissuade them from wanting such restrictions?

I believe inventors as is the case went to the government and got the government to make the laws to protect the inventors inventions.

This is what I believe to be the case. I'll once agian use the case of Gutenberg and the printing press. Once he invented it and used it to print the Bible he caused a major major impact on the ways things were handled because until then only priests cardinals bishops or the very wealthy have a Bible for reading and telling what was written but with Gutenberg printing Bibles the " common man " could have a copy to read and interpret thereby breaking one strangle hold the Church had on its communicants. Major inovation casuing a major change in perceptions and culture.

Could Gutenberg have printed plans on how to make a printing press and sold the plans to others on how to make a printing press- yes he could have - and it would have been to his benefit to do so because the "technology" as it were was easily replicated. So if you can't beat them join them and get your licks in while you can.

Once a invention was created the inventor unless they were wealthy would have to go hat in hand to others to raise the capital to build a manufacturing facility and make the invetion and then set up a marjetin program to sell the invetion and a distribution system and so on. OR lacking the capital sell the rights to a manufacturer with soem type of down payment and a royalty per unit manufactured - not sold - but manufactured - so the manufacturer would have an incentive to get the product out there and bought. If some other manufacturer tried to sell the same item without the licensing and royalty agreement then they could get sued for trepass.

As an example of trepass early radio stations would take to court other radio stations who trepassed on their radio frequency bandwidth thereby trepassing on their property.

Si it all comes down to property rights and the right to defend your property from trepass and thievery and damages.

Ron Getty - SF Libertarian
Hostis res Publica
Morte ai Tiranni
Dum Spiro, Pugno

Dear Ron,

My point exactly. We seem to be in the exact same page now. Folks turn to government for solutions in the absence of we libertarians acquainting them sufficiently with private, voluntary remedies that work even better. No fault of the big bad government.

Now, for some more grease in this fire. David Kessler, who has taken "credit" for the recent decision to place tobacco under FDA regulation, was blabbing on NPR today. He related how he and his colleagues worked tirelessly for 15 years studying the detrimental effects of tobacco, and finally changed policy. He is now deep in the study of junk food, and he is "sure the policy will follow." Again, I reiterate, a general focus on Big Brother feels to me like blaming the victim. Maybe a more effective approach might be 1) taking a studied whack at a specific aspect of Big Brother, like Ron Paul's Audit the Fed Bill, and 2) working on modifying the public perception that government is the only entity capable of addressing challenges.

Marcy