NPR/Free State Project

Steve Dekorte asks if anyone heard the NPR discussion on the Free State Project. I did and it was VERY eye opening. We Libertarians make the assumption that given the choice, people would rather be "Free". Well....think again. The NPR episode made the fact that "Freedom" is NOT universally desired by everyone. And the people of the town the Free Staters are taking over are very, very upset.

Marcy

Found the audio archive of the show here -

http://www.npr.org/features/feature.php?wfId=1967764

my guess is that any 'invasion' of foreigners of any
type would cause the same reaction.

I lived in Austin back in the early-mid nineties while
Californians relocated there in droves. As home prices
tripled with the influx of equity, resentment toward
the newcomers flared up, largely by those who couldn't
afford to buy homes in the first place..

david

--- Marcy Berry <amarcyb@...> wrote:

Dear Everyone;

After listening to the audio it became very clear the Free Staters forgot two of the prime principles of politics:

1. First you learn how to crawl - then you learn how to walk - then you learn how to run.

2. Then you tell them what you are going to tell them. Then you tell them. Then you tell them what you told them.

This way you can smooth out some of the speed bumps on the way to a Free State Libertarian City of Grafton. If only the Free Staters had chose to do a door to door neighborhood sit down in the locals homes first. Just to talk about who they were and why they felt they way they do and how they hoped the members of the town would consider some of the points they'd like to make. The Free Staters have now given the appearance of way too much rough shod to the local citizens of Grafton.

Grafton Demographics: 2000 Census: From 1990 to 2000, population in Grafton grew by 23.3 percent to 1,138, adding 215 residents. The median age is 38.8, with 25.0 percent of the population under the age of 18 and 10.1 percent age 65 and older. The total number of households is 455, with an average size of 2.5 persons. Of those, 306 are family households, with an average size of 3.0 persons. As of April 1, 2000, there were 692 total housing units.

From the demographic census it's no wonder the citizens of Grafton sounded enraged and somewhat scared about what is supposed to happen when they become outnumbered. A Libertarian Army bringing freedom from the tyranny of " Dictator Taxes ". Whether they want it or not.

I have to wonder if the Free Staters are familiar with one of the basic Libertarian principles of individual liberty. A liberty which does not force someone to submit to Libertarian principles if that person does not know what those principles are. And would not want to live under those principles by fiat. But would live under them if it was by free choice.

Ron Getty
SF Libertarian

David Rhodes <dfrhodes@...> wrote:
Found the audio archive of the show here -

http://www.npr.org/features/feature.php?wfId=1967764

my guess is that any 'invasion' of foreigners of any
type would cause the same reaction.

I lived in Austin back in the early-mid nineties while
Californians relocated there in droves. As home prices
tripled with the influx of equity, resentment toward
the newcomers flared up, largely by those who couldn't
afford to buy homes in the first place..

david

--- Marcy Berry <amarcyb@...> wrote:

Steve Dekorte asks if anyone heard the NPR
discussion on the Free State Project. I did and it
was VERY eye opening. We Libertarians make the
assumption that given the choice, people would
rather be "Free". Well....think again. The NPR
episode made the fact that "Freedom" is NOT
universally desired by everyone. And the people of
the town the Free Staters are taking over are very,
very upset.

Marcy

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