Government isn't *always* less efficient - exception to the rule

Although government continues to be the reigning champion of bureaucracy and the inability to get simple things done in a timely or effective manner due to its perverse incentives, large non-government organizations can often exhibit similar problems. I've recently been trying to get the American Automobile Association to issue me a membership card with my name printed correctly as one word only. So far, numerous visits and phone calls have not translated into success. Bad software is blamed. Surprisingly however, I was able to get a similar task done in relatively little time at the Department of Motor Vehicles, where they issued me a driver's license listing me as Starchild upon being shown proof that this was my name. Score one for government.

Love & Liberty,
        ((( starchild )))

Maybe, but at what cost? And to whom?

Isn't a measure of efficiency based on resources expended to achieve the
outcome?

Behalf Of Starchild

David,

  Nothing I said below should be interpreted as an attempt to dismiss any of the usual libertarian analysis of coercively funded and wasteful government, etc., i.e. I was simply comparing responsiveness on a relatively narrow "customer service" issue, not making a broad analysis of total operational cost or morality. Hope that answers your questions.

Love & Liberty,
        ((( starchild )))

No problem Starchild, I wasn't doubting you. Just curious about your use of
'efficient'. Maybe you meant expedient? Or responsive?

I have been hearing quite a bit about this recently due to the ongoing
healthcare reform debate. I've heard crazy arguments from the left that the
military and USPS are good examples of 'efficient' government services and
because of this a well-run national healthcare system is achievable.

Behalf Of Starchild