Disappointed by unverified reports that Trump is breaking his promises to shut down the Government.

Disappointed by unverified reports that Trump is breaking his promises to
shut down the Government.

Libertarians are disappointed to learn from unverified news reports that
Trump is backing down on his promises to shut down the government. Congress
needs to raise the debt ceiling by Sept. 29. Another deadline potentially
looms because congressional leaders plan to introduce a bill that would
essentially finance government operations at existing levels from Oct. 1
into some time in December. Even if this passes the Senate which seems
unlikely, Trump has promised not to sign it thereby shutting down the
government, unless it includes $20 billion for his wall. Libertarians will
finally get what we have long wanted and advocated, which is for the
government to shut down. But now it seems that Trump is backing down on his
promise to shut down the government. This just goes to show that Trump does
not keep his promises and he is just another governmental cop-out.

Sam Sloan

It's certainly true that Donald Trump can't be trusted, but sadly I doubt that his vetoing a debt ceiling increase would result in any meaningful government shutdown anyway. When Congress has temporarily refused to raise the limit in the past, I think all the government employees who didn't work during the "shutdowns" have ended up getting paid for that time, and then some. I suppose there might still be marginal benefit in keeping away from their jobs temporarily even if they get paid extra for not working, but it likely that the probable result of the president refusing to sign a debt ceiling increase would simply be G-men and G-women getting a short paid vacation.

  The debt ceiling gets raised when Congress has already appropriated money in excess of the current borrowing limits. What they need to do is grow some spines, stop appropriating money in excess of those limits, and start passing spending cuts. But that would require them to vote against specific interests, so they find it politically easier to remain in the Invertebrate Caucus, spend the money, and then (at best) posture against raising the debt limit. Unfortunately, this approach has been shown to be ineffective at reining in the growth of government.

Love & Liberty,
                                ((( starchild )))