Compressed Air Technology Car

Something interesting

Mike

Any other ideas, anyone?

In fact, there is another concept for alternative fuel that may just be
what the world has been waiting for. A French manufacturer has been
working on (and completed) the world's first air car.

Running on Compressed Air Technology and therefore called CAT, the new
urban car developed by Moteur Developement International (MDI) has zero
emissions.

The compressed air that powers the two-stroke engine is stored in
"light-weight tanks [that] are made of carbon fiber and hold 200 liters
of air at a pressure of 4,351 pounds per square inch (p/si)," stated a
recent report on the Science Channel. "With this amount of air, the car
can travel 150 kilometers [93 miles] in the city."

"Air is forced through an injector where it expands, pushing down on
pistons that turn the crank shaft to power the car. The engine is also
specially designed to [allow] multiple engines to be joined together,
giving the car more power. Which means, each air car model comes with
the option of a 2-, 4- or 6-cylinder engine."

Fueling up is easy: You fill the tank by plugging into a normal electric
outlet at home, which takes about 4 hours. Cost: 1.50 euros ($2.36).

If you don't have that much time, it takes only 3 minutes to fill your
tank with a high-pressure air pump at a gas station ("air stations" have
yet to be designed). MDI estimates that this will increase the cost of a
full tank by 40 to 60 percent--resulting in a whopping $3.53. The same
distance (93 miles) traveled in a gasoline-powered car costs Americans
around $12 these days.

Sounds too good to be true?

Well, there is a catch: The CAT can only reach a speed of 68 mph and is
therefore best suited for urban traffic. Also, while the engine runs
solely on compressed air at speeds of 37 mph or less, at higher speeds
it still depends on traditional fossil fuel. However, environmentally
(and financially) conscious urbanites may embrace this little vehicle as
the city car of the future. [To watch the Science Channel report, click
here
<http://science.discovery.com/fansites/discoveriesthisweek/videogallery/
videogallery.html?myClip=dtw_aircar> .]

Four models are available so far--a car, a taxi (5 passengers), a
pick-up truck and a van. MDI expects to produce 3,000 CATs per year for
now, with a final selling price of around $8,670.

A mass launch in the U.S. is not yet planned, but if you're interested
in buying one of the prototypes, you can join a list on MDI's website:
http://www.theaircar.com/models_iwantone.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flywheel_energy_storage

The nice thing about flywheels is that they're well suited for use in electric vehicles.

-- Steve

Dear Mike;
   
  You asked for any other idesa - try this one.
   
  Here's another method involving cryo-tempering which requires dipping car engine parts in liquid nitrogen and freezing the metal causing a changew in the metal and as a result the guy has to tank up only once every TWO MONTHS!!
   
  http://www.kfor.com/Global/story.asp?S=3390503&nav=6uy5aHLq
   
  Ron Getty
  SF Libertarian

Mike Denny <mike@...> wrote:
        st1\:*{behavior:url(#default#ieooui) } Something interesting
   
  Mike
   
  Any other ideas, anyone?
  In fact, there is another concept for alternative fuel that may just be what the world has been waiting for. A French manufacturer has been working on (and completed) the world's first air car.
  Running on Compressed Air Technology and therefore called CAT, the new urban car developed by Moteur Developement International (MDI) has zero emissions.
  The compressed air that powers the two-stroke engine is stored in "light-weight tanks [that] are made of carbon fiber and hold 200 liters of air at a pressure of 4,351 pounds per square inch (p/si)," stated a recent report on the Science Channel. "With this amount of air, the car can travel 150 kilometers [93 miles] in the city."
  "Air is forced through an injector where it expands, pushing down on pistons that turn the crank shaft to power the car. The engine is also specially designed to [allow] multiple engines to be joined together, giving the car more power. Which means, each air car model comes with the option of a 2-, 4- or 6-cylinder engine."
  Fueling up is easy: You fill the tank by plugging into a normal electric outlet at home, which takes about 4 hours. Cost: 1.50 euros ($2.36).
  If you don't have that much time, it takes only 3 minutes to fill your tank with a high-pressure air pump at a gas station ("air stations" have yet to be designed). MDI estimates that this will increase the cost of a full tank by 40 to 60 percent--resulting in a whopping $3.53. The same distance (93 miles) traveled in a gasoline-powered car costs Americans around $12 these days.
  Sounds too good to be true?
  Well, there is a catch: The CAT can only reach a speed of 68 mph and is therefore best suited for urban traffic. Also, while the engine runs solely on compressed air at speeds of 37 mph or less, at higher speeds it still depends on traditional fossil fuel. However, environmentally (and financially) conscious urbanites may embrace this little vehicle as the city car of the future. [To watch the Science Channel report, click here.]
  Four models are available so far--a car, a taxi (5 passengers), a pick-up truck and a van. MDI expects to produce 3,000 CATs per year for now, with a final selling price of around $8,670.
  A mass launch in the U.S. is not yet planned, but if you're interested in buying one of the prototypes, you can join a list on MDI's website: http://www.theaircar.com/models_iwantone.html
   
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Ron,

  This is fascinating. I'm still not sure I understand why cryogenically freezing the engine parts would make the car use less gas, but it sounds terrific. I wonder how much the home freezing unit employed by this guy costs, and how much each application costs. If it's economical, I could imagine everyone having one in their home to improve the durability of all kinds of common metal items.

Yours in liberty,
        <<< starchild >>>

Dear Mike;

You asked for any other idesa - try this one.

Here's another method involving cryo-tempering which requires dipping car engine parts in liquid nitrogen and freezing the metal causing a changew in the metal and as a result the guy has to tank up only once every TWO MONTHS!!

http://www.kfor.com/Global/story.asp?S=3390503&nav=6uy5aHLq

Ron Getty
SF Libertarian

Mike Denny <mike@...> wrote:

st1\:*{behavior:url(#default#ieooui) }
Something interesting

Mike

Any other ideas, anyone?
In fact, there is another concept for alternative fuel that may just be what the world has been waiting for. A French manufacturer has been working on (and completed) the world's first air car.
Running on Compressed Air Technology and therefore called CAT, the new urban car developed by Moteur Developement International (MDI) has zero emissions.
The compressed air that powers the two-stroke engine is stored in "light-weight tanks [that] are made of carbon fiber and hold 200 liters of air at a pressure of 4,351 pounds per square inch (p/si)," stated a recent report on the Science Channel. "With this amount of air, the car can travel 150 kilometers [93 miles] in the city."
"Air is forced through an injector where it expands, pushing down on pistons that turn the crank shaft to power the car. The engine is also specially designed to [allow] multiple engines to be joined together, giving the car more power. Which means, each air car model comes with the option of a 2-, 4- or 6-cylinder engine."
Fueling up is easy: You fill the tank by plugging into a normal electric outlet at home, which takes about 4 hours. Cost: 1.50 euros ($2.36).
If you don't have that much time, it takes only 3 minutes to fill your tank with a high-pressure air pump at a gas station ("air stations" have yet to be designed). MDI estimates that this will increase the cost of a full tank by 40 to 60 percent--resulting in a whopping $3.53. The same distance (93 miles) traveled in a gasoline-powered car costs Americans around $12 these days.
Sounds too good to be true?
Well, there is a catch: The CAT can only reach a speed of 68 mph and is therefore best suited for urban traffic. Also, while the engine runs solely on compressed air at speeds of 37 mph or less, at higher speeds it still depends on traditional fossil fuel. However, environmentally (and financially) conscious urbanites may embrace this little vehicle as the city car of the future. [To watch the Science Channel report, click here.]
Four models are available so far--a car, a taxi (5 passengers), a pick-up truck and a van. MDI expects to produce 3,000 CATs per year for now, with a final selling price of around $8,670.
A mass launch in the U.S. is not yet planned, but if you're interested in buying one of the prototypes, you can join a list on MDI's website: http://www.theaircar.com/models_iwantone.html

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Dear Starchild and Anyone Else Interested;
   
  Here's the web site of a company which helps people do cryo-tempering - I might add that it can also be used for firearms. Yes the metal parts can be cryo-tempered and there are a couple articles about doing that.
   
  Otherwise it can be used on basically any metal part.
   
  http://www.lngenterprises.com/index.html
   
  This web site has a handy thumbnails of what controlled thermal processing is all about.
   
  http://www.metal-wear.com/More%20Detail.htm
   
  This company does cryo-tempering:
   
  http://www.300below.com/site/home.html
   
  This Google url is for cryo-tempering in general. You may want to run it for specific articles on cryo-tempering handguns - if that would help your interest.
   
  http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&q=cryo-tempering+&btnG=Search
   
  Enjoy - One thing it is NOT the same thing as people freezing themselves to be revived once the cure for what ailed them is found.
   
  Ron Getty
  SF Libertarian
   
Starchild <sfdreamer@...> wrote:
  Ron,

This is fascinating. I'm still not sure I understand why cryogenically
freezing the engine parts would make the car use less gas, but it
sounds terrific. I wonder how much the home freezing unit employed by
this guy costs, and how much each application costs. If it's
economical, I could imagine everyone having one in their home to
improve the durability of all kinds of common metal items.

Yours in liberty,
<<< starchild >>>