Bush Confesses to War Crimes

http://onlinejournal.com/artman/publish/article_1185.shtml

"""George W. Bush's speech on September 6 amounted to a public confession to criminal violations of the 1996 War Crimes Act. He implicitly admitted authorizing disappearances, extrajudicial imprisonment, torture, transporting prisoners between countries and denying the International Committee of the Red Cross access to prisoners.

These are all serious violations of the Geneva Conventions. The War Crimes Act makes grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions and all violations of Common Article 3 punishable by fines, imprisonment or, if death results to the victim, the death penalty.

At the same time, Bush asked Congress to amend the War Crimes Act in order to retroactively protect him and other U.S. officials from prosecution for these crimes, and from civil lawsuits arising from them. He justified this on the basis that "our military and intelligence personnel involved in capturing and questioning terrorists could now be at risk of prosecution under the War Crimes Act . . . ," and insisted that “passing this legislation ought to be the top priority” for Congress between now and the election in November.

"""

I heard the speech on the radio, and the thought occurred to me how
can anyone apply the rules of *war* when there is no war as described
in those rules? Who is is enemy country? What country's fighting
force?

Marcy

http://onlinejournal.com/artman/publish/article_1185.shtml

"""George W. Bush's speech on September 6 amounted to a public
confession to criminal violations of the 1996 War Crimes Act. He
implicitly admitted authorizing disappearances, extrajudicial
imprisonment, torture, transporting prisoners between countries

and

denying the International Committee of the Red Cross access to
prisoners.

These are all serious violations of the Geneva Conventions. The

War

Crimes Act makes grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions and all
violations of Common Article 3 punishable by fines, imprisonment

or,

if death results to the victim, the death penalty.

At the same time, Bush asked Congress to amend the War Crimes Act

in

order to retroactively protect him and other U.S. officials from
prosecution for these crimes, and from civil lawsuits arising from
them. He justified this on the basis that "our military and
intelligence personnel involved in capturing and questioning
terrorists could now be at risk of prosecution under the War

Crimes

Act . . . ," and insisted that "passing this legislation ought to

be

the top priority" for Congress between now and the election in

November.