Better? Ed Crane

What do you think?

Mike

Dear Mr. Crane,

I am in receipt of your attached letter asking me to reinstate my support for the Cato Institute. Unfortunately, I cannot do so in good conscience and want to tell you why.

First, allow me to say that Cato has done a pretty good job of identifying issues that need to be addressed...social security, health care, property rights and the Middle East. However, I have problems with your political strategy. Allow me to elaborate.

You may remember our dinner in San Francisco around 1999-2000 with two local Libertarians. We spoke at length about the best political action plan to advance the cause of Liberty. You advocated strong support for Republicans and George W. Bush as you and Cato "had their ear" and were confident you could "bring them around". You suggested there were lots of things "going on behind the scenes" you were privy to that suggested George Bush would be a strong advocate for Liberty once he got into the White House.

We Libertarians spoke of the impossibility of moving towards Liberty from within the Republican Party. We mentioned Norman Thomas who ran for president for the Socialist Party six times and never won. Yet his platform was largely adopted by both the Republicans and Democrats. We invited Cato to join arms with the Libertarian Party and use us as a lever with the Republicans. I remember you chuckling as you perceived our reasoning to be naïve.

So now we've had 6 years of George W. Bush and a Congress ruled by Republicans and what does Liberty have to show for it?...very little in my view. I strongly feel Cato will never advance the cause of Liberty by negotiating with the Republicans while simultaneously living in their tent.

I'll support Cato if they get back to their Libertarian roots, roll up their sleeves and show the Republicans what they will lose if they don't take these issues seriously. I'm tired of seeing Republicans use Cato's agenda to secure support for their anti-Liberty agenda. When I see Cato's strategy working, I'll support it. In the meantime, I'll focus my energy locally and work to sell the Libertarian message. I can see progress here little by little...and I'm not seeing it at Cato.

Let me know how it goes. I look forward to hearing from you.

Sincerely,

[ Attachment content not displayed ]

Dear Mike;
   
  Bueno - Senor Denny!!!
   
  It reads better as it does acknowledge previous achievments but also a getting away from the core roots of what once was a Libertarian think tank not an arm of the Republican Party.
   
  Ron Getty
  SF Libertarian.

Mike Denny <mike@...> wrote:
        st1\:*{behavior:url(#default#ieooui) } What do you think?
   
  Mike
   
  Dear Mr. Crane,
   
  I am in receipt of your attached letter asking me to reinstate my support for the Cato Institute. Unfortunately, I cannot do so in good conscience and want to tell you why.
   
  First, allow me to say that Cato has done a pretty good job of identifying issues that need to be addressed�social security, health care, property rights and the Middle East. However, I have problems with your political strategy. Allow me to elaborate.
   
  You may remember our dinner in San Francisco around 1999-2000 with two local Libertarians. We spoke at length about the best political action plan to advance the cause of Liberty. You advocated strong support for Republicans and George W. Bush as you and Cato �had their ear� and were confident you could �bring them around�. You suggested there were lots of things �going on behind the scenes� you were privy to that suggested George Bush would be a strong advocate for Liberty once he got into the White House.
   
  We Libertarians spoke of the impossibility of moving towards Liberty from within the Republican Party. We mentioned Norman Thomas who ran for president for the Socialist Party six times and never won. Yet his platform was largely adopted by both the Republicans and Democrats. We invited Cato to join arms with the Libertarian Party and use us as a lever with the Republicans. I remember you chuckling as you perceived our reasoning to be na�ve.
   
  So now we�ve had 6 years of George W. Bush and a Congress ruled by Republicans and what does Liberty have to show for it?...very little in my view. I strongly feel Cato will never advance the cause of Liberty by negotiating with the Republicans while simultaneously living in their tent.
   
  I�ll support Cato if they get back to their Libertarian roots, roll up their sleeves and show the Republicans what they will lose if they don�t take these issues seriously. I�m tired of seeing Republicans use Cato�s agenda to secure support for their anti-Liberty agenda. When I see Cato�s strategy working, I�ll support it. In the meantime, I�ll focus my energy locally and work to sell the Libertarian message. I can see progress here little by little�and I�m not seeing it at Cato.
   
  Let me know how it goes. I look forward to hearing from you.
   
  Sincerely,
   
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I agree, the letter looks great. I hesitate to suggest further revisions, because this is the kind of thing that could probably go on endlessly, but I noticed one other thing I might qualify, namely the closing statement about not seeing progress at Cato.

  In my view it's not that there has been no progress -- Cato's influence among Republican leaders has paid off in some ways, perhaps most importantly by giving the think tank and its ideas a vastly higher public profile -- but that progress has come at the enormous cost of giving political support and cover to an administration that on the whole has done vastly more harm than good, and has mostly failed in the areas where it has attempted to pursue a more libertarian approach, such as Social Security, free trade, and immigration.

  Morey, great point about striking the root. I concur entirely.

Yours in liberty,
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